Monthly Archives: May 2014

Technical Support Article for Sharing Your iOS Device Files

It’s true that you can use your iPad instead of your Mac to take care of many common computing tasks. But unless you’re ready to ditch Mac OS X entirely, you’ll still need to transfer files back and forth between your iPad and your Mac if you’re going to get work done.

Unfortunately, transferring and synchronising files between the Mac and the tablet isn’t easy. There are several different ways to do it, but none are perfect, and each has its deficiencies. Frankly, this is one area where Apple could vastly improve the iPad experience. Until that happens, here are your choices when it comes to transferring files between your various devices.

iTunes

Apple’s officially endorsed route for file-transfers between iPad and Mac is via iTunes file-sharing. Unfortunately, it’s an amazingly clunky process.

For one thing, it only works with apps that support it. All of Apple’s iPad creation tools—Pages, Keynote, Numbers, GarageBand and iMovie—use iTunes to move files back and forth. Some third-party apps—e-readers, text editors and media creation tools—do too.

But even then, different apps use iTunes in different ways: Apple’s apps, for example, require you to select Save to iTunes when saving a document; other apps make their files available to iTunes automatically.

Worse, though, is the constant manual effort required to keep files in sync. By now, you probably know the routine: Connect your iPad directly to your Mac and open iTunes. Select your iPad in the iTunes source list and click on the Apps tab. Scroll down past the list of installed apps and look for the File Sharing section. Tap the app you want to copy a file from, so its files appear in the Documents pane. Drag one or more of those files to the Desktop (while holding down Option key) to copy them there, or use the Save To button to open a traditional save dialog. If you update a file on your Mac and want to send it back to the iPad, you must then drag that changed file back into iTunes, onto the correct app’s document list again.

It’s hardly elegant.

I have yet to find any solution—an AppleScript, an Automator workflow, a third-party utility—that makes this process any easier. For that reason, I use iTunes file-sharing as an extra backup for lengthy Pages documents and GarageBand projects, but for little else. The workflow required to work on a single file from both your Mac and your iPad is simply too awkward for more frequent use.

Cloud Storage

When I think about file synchronisation, I immediately think of Dropbox (free for 2GB). The service is great at keeping files in sync between my computers. So how does it fare at syncing files between Macs and iPads?

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Unfortunately, Dropbox on the iPad is merely adequate—but not through any fault of its own. The Dropbox app, like numerous other cloud storage services (including MobileMe iDisk), offers an easy way to access any files and folders you store with the service. Dropbox’s app makes it a cinch to view any data that’s in iOS-friendly formats, including Word and Pages documents, PDFs, text files, and images. Even better, Dropbox and others like it offer you the option of opening your synced files in their compatible iPad apps; you can, for example, use the Dropbox app to send a word-processing document to Pages.

The flaw in this process is that there’s no way to send the updated file back to Dropbox again from within Pages again. Because of limitations in how iOS currently operates, cloud-storage apps are a one-way street on the iPad. It’s simple to get files from Dropbox into an app, but you can’t send them back to Dropbox when you’re done.

There is one sort-of workaround. In apps that support WebDAV–such as Pages—you can use DropDAV (free for 2GB) to access your Dropbox folder. DropDAV lets you interact with your Dropbox files via a traditional WebDAV connection. Since Pages lets you open files from a remote WebDAV server, you can get your document and edit it on your tablet. Just remember that you’re working on a local copy. When you’re ready to save, you must manually publish your document back to the DropDAV-created WebDAV server. It’s definitely the easiest way to approximate the Dropbox Mac experience on your iPad, but it’s still far from seamless.

Cloud-Compatible Apps

There are some iPad apps that have built-in support for cloud storage (most commonly Dropbox). In fact, Dropbox’s Website lists more than 130 apps that integrate with the service in some way.

There’s a slew of Dropbox-compatible iPad text editors, for example, including Elements ($5.00), iA Writer ($1.19), and Textastic ($12.99). With those editors, syncing feels seamless; your changes save directly into Dropbox; changes you make on your Mac are picked up almost immediately on your iPad. There’s no need to connect your iPad to your Mac; the process feels effortless.

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Besides text editors, the list of Dropbox-compatible apps includes full-fledged word processors such as DocumentsToGo ($19.99), QuickOffice ($5.99), and Office2 ($7.99); file readers like ReaddleDocs ($5.99) and GoodReader ($5.99); audio note apps like DropVox ($1.19), Audio Memos ($1.19), Mobile Recorder ($1.19), and Smart Recorder ($3.99), and many more. When apps let you open and save documents directly from and to Dropbox, sane file management becomes painless.

Apple’s iPad apps don’t integrate with Dropbox, but they do work with MobileMe iDisk. Unfortunately, their integration with it isn’t nearly as smooth as you get with the best of the Dropbox apps. Publishing to iDisk is too much like iTunes File Sharing; you’re copying your file to the remote server, instead of maintaining a single, always-in-sync version.

But what Apple’s iWork suite lacks in syncing quality, it attempts to make up for in the number of ways you can sync: Besides iDisk, you can share iWork documents via iWork.com, send them to iTunes, or copy them via WebDAV. None of those options matches the simplicity of the Dropbox-enabled apps I’ve used. The DropDAV service mentioned earlier helps a bit, but lacks all the niceties that true Dropbox integration can offer.

Email

Unless and until Apple and other vendors build full two-way sync into their apps, the next best thing is email.

Email, of course, is no closer to true realtime synchronising than iTunes File Sharing; you’re still sending copies of your file back and forth, and you have to be careful that you’re always working on the latest version. But emailing offers a couple distinct advantages over the iTunes model.

First, you don’t have to connect your iPad to your Mac. Second, emails include date-stamps, so you don’t need to guess whether you’re working with the most recent version of a file; you can see precisely when you sent it to yourself.

If you plan to rely on email file transfers a lot, it may be worth creating special rules in your mail client of choice to handle these special messages. For example, in Gmail I created a filter that looks for messages that are both from me and to me, and that contain attachments. Those messages get a Files tag and are archived; this way, the Mail app on my iPad shows them neatly tucked into a folder with the same name.

OK, just enjoy reading article about Mac or iOS devices on our site to get more technical support what you need.

How to Manage Stock Menu Bar Items on Mac OS X

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When you initially install OS X, there are a few items that are placed in your menu bar by default. There are a couple of ways to go about adding or removing stock OS items from your menu bar in an effort to keep it tidy and organized.

In this tutorial, we’ll cover some of the basic menu bar management tips for stock menu bar items. This includes basic tips on rearranging, removing, and adding items back to the menu bar. We’ve also got a handy video showcasing some of the basic concepts of stock menu bar item management. Have a look inside for more details.

Removing items from the menu bar

Items can be removed from the menu bar by unchecking the menu bar option in the item’s preferences, or by a simple ⌘+drag away from menu bar and release.

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To do so by means of the item’s preferences, open the Preferences app and navigate to the section containing your particular menu bar item. Once there, uncheck the “show in menu bar” option and you should see the associated menu bar item immediately disappear. You can add items back by checking the menu bar option; they should reappear immediately.

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Rearranging items in the menu bar

Stock menu bar items can be easily rearranged using the same ⌘+drag mentioned in the removal section above; the only difference is, instead of dragging them out of the menu bar and releasing, you position your cursor on the menu bar at the place you’d like the item to reside and release.

Just like the previous section mentioned, rearranging menu bar items can only be done with stock items. You cannot do this with third party apps that place items in the menu bar. There is another utility that we will cover in a future post that allows you to better manage all menu bar items, and that includes third party items as well.

A few exceptions

While most of the stock menu bar icons such as Time Machine, time, user, Bluetooth, AirPlay, Wi-Fi, sound and various others can be moved and removed with no issue, there are a few exceptions to the rules. Spotlight search can neither be removed or moved to a different area of the screen. It will always occupy the second to right-most portion of your menu bar. The other exception is Notification Center, which is the right-most app icon available in the menu bar. It should be mentioned that you can’t even hide these icons by unchecking their menu bar options in the Preferences app; these two particular menu bar items are here to stay.

That’s about as far as you can take menu bar management without the help of additional utilities. As you can see, managing the menu bar is quite limited with stock OS X, but a whole new can of worms can be opened up with a handy third party utility. We’ll be back with more examples and tips on managing the menu bar in OS X. In the meantime, leave us a comment below discussing how you manage the menu bar items on your system.

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